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Connecting Customer Experience and Customer Service Data: The Key to Winning in Today’s Competitive Landscape

Customer journeys are complex—and that intricacy is only amplified when customer experience and customer service data live in silos.

In fact, 80% of companies report problematic data silos holding back their organizations.

Your organization is likely already collecting customer experience data across a host of channels and touchpoints, including digital, contact center, brick-and-mortar, and more. Meanwhile, your contact center is also using tools such as workforce managementcase management, performance management, and more.

Your teams need access to each other’s data. When you connect customer experience and customer service data, you open up new opportunities to drive the customer experience forward.

4 Opportunities of Connecting Customer Experience and Customer Service Data

Connecting customer experience and customer service data has become even more important today, as customer expectations grow and organizational resources stay the same—or even decrease as companies navigate The Great Resignation. As your customers continue to shift to digital channels, you are facing an increasing number of interactions and skyrocketing expectations with a limited set of resources to engage with customers. This widening gap between expectations and results is the Engagement Capacity Gap.

When you connect customer experience and customer service data at your organization, you can:

  • Maximize your data: With a flood of information always coming in, you can make sure you’re not leaving valuable data on the table—especially unstructured speech data from the call center.
  • Prioritize the best actions to take: Finding problems is the easy part. But when you connect customer experience and customer service data, you can identify fixes, changes, and strategies that move the needle on business outcomes.
  • Analyze data in real time: When you connect data streams, pulling actionable insights from your existing customer experience and customer service programs becomes possible at scale—and in real time.
  • Make a commitment: When data no longer lives in silos, teams can become more connected and share relevant data that makes their jobs easier—even boosting the employee experience. That’s how you can get the buy-in you need from all teams across the organization to make a commitment to the customer experience.

5 Benefits of Connecting Customer Experience and Customer Service Data

However, connecting customer experience and customer service data isn’t a box you can just check. It must be an essential part of doing business and an organizational mandate if you want to compete and win.

Insights from different channels, sources, and touchpoints must remain visible to leaders across business units and the contact center.

Connecting customer experience and customer service data leads to several benefits, including:

  1. All customer and employee feedback lives in one place.
  2. Integrated omnichannel insights give visibility into specific interactions, with the ability to drill down to individual customer calls and paths (complete with alerts and triggers).
  3. Data is encrypted, secure, and in real time.
  4. You can identify themes and trends that require cross-channel visibility for customer types, journeys, or interaction points.
  5. You’re able to quickly distribute insights and speed decision-making at all levels of your organization.

Evolve Your Customer Experience Management Program

By connecting customer experience and customer service data and insights, you can better manage three things:

  1. Close visibility gaps by connecting vital customer feedback with operational call center data.
  2. Quickly arm teams with the insight they need to innovate and solve problems across both the customer and employee journey.
  3. Improve customer interactions and employee experience, and then connect these changes to strategic business goals.

To compete today, however, you’ll need to level up your customer experience management program. Your organization is likely already collecting customer experience data, such as CSAT, NPS,* digital feedback, and unstructured insights gathered from speech and text analytics. And you’re likely collecting customer service data, such as call recordings, contact center agent performance and coaching, and quality scores.

You need a unified approach to data integration, analysis, and visualization. This framework must include the inputs from all your channels—behavioral, attitudinal, and inferred—from your physical locations, digital, and contact center engagements.

That may sound intimidating, but a unified and business-wide approach to customer experience simplifies and amplifies your efforts. Simply put, connect the data for maximum opportunity—for both the customer and employee experience.

Download Verint’s “Customer Experience + Customer Service: Breaking Silos to Unify CX” eBook to learn how to build an innovative customer experience management program necessary to compete today.

*Net Promoter, Net Promoter System, Net Promoter Score, NPS and the NPS-related emoticons are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Inc., Fred Reichheld and Satmetrix Systems, Inc.

CX Best Practices, CX Strategy

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